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Old April 27th, 2001, 11:14 PM   #1
roo
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Anyone into The Campbell/Moyer series, <i>The Power of Myth?</i> Anyone here a student Jung?
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Old April 27th, 2001, 11:26 PM   #2
roo
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Talking Yeah I amm first!

I've been working my way through the folders, and I wanted to post but I just don't fit in any of the other categories, so I made my own .

I grew up in a very traditional Roman Catholic family, went to Catholic school etc. The appeal to me was not the theology, but the engrossing sense of <i>Other</i>. It was other time, other place. We stepped out of our daily lives and entered a sacred space, a mystery. I stopped going to mass after Vatican II and the introduction of the venacular into mass. It became folk singing, English, nuns in civilian clothing. The mythic posture was gone for me.

I am fascinated by myth, by what Jung called "the collective unconscious," and how so many motifs exists across impossible geographic boundaries (the christian motif of flood as a metaphor for renewal, almost word for word the same myth spoken by aborginies in the outback deserts of Australia, building together into archetypes.) Either we spread out with a common memory, losing all vistages of that memory except those thin motifs & archetypes, or we really do share some dreamtime place and connect there.

Those are things that fascinate me. Anyone else?
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Old July 23rd, 2001, 09:29 AM   #3
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Mythic DNA

Sorry to take so long to reply. I'm new. I find the collective unconscious an excellent metaphor for many experiences in my life. I also believe that some imagery comes to us from the elctro-chemical processes in our bodies. The double helix of DNA suggests the spiral nake dances at births and deaths. The renewing flood arises from the mentural blood that comes at the climax of a week of tension laden internal tides. I'm sure there are others. I do not think this denies the collective unconscious, it may be the road that takes us to it, however.
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Old July 27th, 2001, 06:30 PM   #4
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Hey, roo...

I remember Vatican II, and I'm older than you are...Vatican II began in 1962...so when exactly did you stop going to Mass? Didn't you have to go to Mass in Catholic School?


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Old July 27th, 2001, 07:16 PM   #5
roo
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((((((Scribe)))))))

What put me off was this:

To me, up until grade 5, mass was a semi-mystical experience. You would step out of your every day life. Our church in particular was very dark, high ceilinged, mysterious. The ceiling was alot like the small wedding chapel of Notre Dame in Quebec, right down to the gold encrusted stars of the ceiling.

In our parish the mass was always in Latin. We tookk years of Latin throughout elementary school so we could understand it. All the books were in Latin. Nothing was in English. More people in that parish spoke Latin than English.

In 1969 our parish was forced to go with an English mass. All of a sudden our nuns went from full wimples and being armed with rosary beads... to civilian dresses that came to their mid-thighs. We went from rich litanies in Latin to nuns in guitars and folk masses. It happened in one week. It was glaring and jarring to me. We went from the scared to the profane in one short week. I'm sure the transition in other places was slower, but we were one of the last American churches to give up the high latin mass.

To me, spirituality is everyday and in all thinks. I think I am more spiritually centered in a river wader, waving a graphite fly rod back and forth, than I ever was in church. But I want "mass" to be a sacred thing,m a special thing, where I can doff off my worries, step out of my normal life, and enter into a deeper realm where the physical and tangiable receede, and there is only the spiritual.

Does that make sense? At nine I utterly rejected English mass. When I lived in Germany, I went to a local parish, although I was in no way a Catholic or Christian, because their high mass was still in Latin not German. I wondered back into what I knew as a kid. I found it as comforting as... well liviing abroad and finding a box of mac and cheese in a foreign market!
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Old March 22nd, 2002, 04:55 PM   #6
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I adore all of Campbell's writings.
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