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Old March 11th, 2001, 12:24 AM   #31
Lou
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(((((BookLovers)))))

Just wanted to stop by and tell you that "House of Sand and Fog" has turned out to be one of those books that I look forward to reading and will hate to see end. And I find it very disturbing. Let's see--I find it disturbing because I understand the Kathy Nicolo character too well. I find it disturbing because I know the landscape well. I find it disturbing because I so want to dislike the Persian man, yet sympathize with him. And I find it disturbing because there's a cop in there who I'd like to see jailed. I'd say this is a novel of moral dilemmas and the beds people make for themselves. I'm nervous about how it's all going to end.
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Old March 31st, 2001, 09:54 AM   #32
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For Crying Out Loud!

This book by a new author C P Whitaker is awesome!! I'm an Oprah book club fan and this one fits right in. Except that it's a little lighter and has a lot of life experience chuckles in it. I guess the best description would be Fannie Flagg, Alice Walker, Armistead Maupin all rolled into one. It's funny and romantic and tense and eye opening.

The ending will make your mouth hang open, too. I fanyone has read it I'd love to know if you were as surprised as I was!

The best part is that it's supposed to be a six part series. The next one's due out in September I think that's what I read somewhere. My local book club's going to pick it up for the May reading.

Oprah needs to jump on this one!!!
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Old April 23rd, 2001, 12:34 AM   #33
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All Harry Middleton: Started with <b>The Earth Is Enough. </b>Of course on the surface it is about fly fishing and coming of age. But it is more about living true to your passioons, choosing to live simply, to be willing to be viewed as an outcast because you value life spent in momnts not in possessions or property. Mostly, it is about loyality, passage and change. I found it very powerful.

I started on <b>On The Spine of Time,</b> which is more of a collection of essays.

My favorite comfort books are The Lord of The Rings, which I read every year the week of my birthday. Also still will reread anything by Laura Ingalls Wilder and C.S. Lewis.

Probably one book with a profound effect on me was Merton's <b>New Seeds of Contemplation </b>and Nancy Sintar's <b>Ordinary People as Monks And Mystics</b>
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Old April 23rd, 2001, 08:17 AM   #34
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Since I last posted I have read Angela's Ashes and Tis by Frank McCourt. I can only say that Angela's Ashes was a book that hit me hard. Ashes was written in a unique style, kind of how a child thinks. I really felt that what he was telling me was happening and his writing style had the impact of truth. Tis lacked the effort and deepness of his first book. Last week I finished "We Were The Mulvaney's" by Joyce Carol Oates. WOW. This book made me think and reminise about some stuff in my own family that I prefer to forget. As I read that book I felt like a child again looking at my life through a watery pool. This story is so sad. I think Oates intended for the ending to bring some closure but I found it disturbing. I have decided that my next book will be one I do not have to think about so I am reading James Patterson's First To Die. I'll let you know how that one is.
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Old April 24th, 2001, 12:27 AM   #35
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Hi Terri! That's Oates for you--disturbing.

I just finished <b>The Red Tent</b> by Anita Diamant. When the members of my book club chose this novel, I was worried that it was another <b>Mists of Avalon</b>. It's the fictionalized version of a Genesis story told from the POV of Jacob's only daughter, Dinah, and I read it quickly because it is intriguing, female, violent, and finally gratifying.
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Old April 24th, 2001, 11:09 PM   #36
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I am re-reading May Sarton's <i>Journal of A Solitude</i> The second Middleton's book is too light-hearted for me right now. I want grim reality and stark contrast. I've read it many times before, but for some reason it is taking my breath away....

<i>One must believe that private dilemmas are, if deeply examined, universal, and so, if expressed, have a human value system beyond the private, and one must also believe in the vehicle for expressing them, in talent."</i>


Oh yeah, and I re-read Rodger Rosenblatt's essay "Marginalia."
<i>The major premises of marginalia is life is definately adjustable. As soon as a work comes under someone else's scrunity, uprises the impulse to correct, enlarge and destroy...One might go so far as to say marginalia reveals the human disire not to accept finality." </i>

One last juicy Rosenblatt: "<i>The difference between thought and speech -- the inchoate mess in our minds as opposed to the crispy words that emerge -- suggests that we live with a number voices at once."</i>

I love that "Crispy words."
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Old April 25th, 2001, 12:22 AM   #37
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Sarton: <i>One must believe that private dilemmas are, if deeply examined, universal, and so, if expressed, have a human value system beyond the private, and one must also believe in the vehicle for expressing them, in talent.</i>

Rosenblatt: <i>The major premises of marginalia is life is definately adjustable. As soon as a work comes under someone else's scrunity, uprises the impulse to correct, enlarge and
destroy...One might go so far as to say marginalia reveals the human disire not to accept finality.</i>

Hi (((((roo)))))

I am studying these to see how you are drawn to the ideas. If private dilemmas become under examination universal, then one does not "destroy" another's work, but finds in it the collective impulse. Ya think?
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Old April 25th, 2001, 04:50 AM   #38
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(((((((Lou)))))))) Yeah sweetie

(((((((roo)))))))) Funny old world hey? I've always found Sarton just too self-obsessed, and the quote you use illustrates why - for me. Her dilemmas are universal? What noive!

I've just finished the new Barbara Kingsolver, <i>Prodigal Summer</i>. Whilst it is surely no <i>Poisonwood Bible</i> I don't believe we could reasonably expect another book of that magnitude from her. Nevertheless P Summer is a splendid read, probably made more wonderful, for me, by the fact that we were visitng Kentucky (the location for the book) whilst I was reading
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Old April 26th, 2001, 09:23 PM   #39
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When I was younger I would get bored with the angst. With everything happening in my life, I find something hard to define, but it speaks to me. Maybe its because her life was such a welter of contrictions, and her botton line is about finding balance to face such extremes. I guess that is self-absorbed in a world filled with war and pain and hunger, but I don't think one can resolve to change anything around them until they find balance and stop demanding and begin to learn to give.


Ahhh Lou, its simple. When something calls the me I scribble notes, underline, argue, critique....all in the margins. You should see my old college books, not an inch free. I was doing it so much the ink was bleeding through and interferring with reading the following pages. It brought to mind the Rosenblatt essay. I dont know about connects beyond that, except I enjoyed Rosenblatt. I've just been thinking about life and loss lately.

OK how is this: <i>I am forty, I have become mortal. I have no further psychic, emotional, or intellectual need to prolong summer seasons, and it is only when autummn begins to play that I can truly focus on the rich and vital life I a living. All of a sudden I grow alert.</i> John Nichols, <u>The Last Beautiful Days</u>
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Old April 27th, 2001, 12:34 AM   #40
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Maybe the trick is to be self-absorbed <i>in secret.</i> Sarton's idea that her private dilemmas are actually universal thoughts does not seem self-absorbed to me, but just the opposite. To realize that one's thoughts are not unique but similar, connected, in sympathy with the thoughts of others seems to me humbling.

(((((Quietude))))) Hi dollface.

(((((roo))))) It's so easy for some of us to write in the margins, so natural. But you know what, I have to <u>teach</u> my students to do this. At first they say, "Write what?" We work on that. But the real problem seems to be an illusion that the bookstore will pay more in buy-back for a clean book. Alas, I tell them, dissuade themselves of this notion. They get 50?, written in or not.
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Old April 27th, 2001, 12:37 AM   #41
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(((((((Lou))))))) I never sold a single book! They are my children!
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Old April 27th, 2001, 12:43 AM   #42
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Ah, do I ever understand that. I sold one, and I remember it very well. It was a large art history book, filled with color prints, gorgeous. But I had two kids and no money, and I sold that book. Now, I have a long shelf of art books, but I still remember that one.

((((((((((roo))))))))))
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Old April 27th, 2001, 07:19 AM   #43
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(((((Roo & Lou))))
You never sold back your math books? UGH I couldn't wait to get them out of my house. I confess to keeping my English Literature book because I love it for the short stories of Flannery O'Conner and I am trying to make myself appreciate poetry (I'm too cynical). I sold back my history books because they were so sparse and I never needed a psych book because our professor told us to take it back she had all the information we would ever need to know (talk about self centered but she did save me $74). Of course I kept all the art books and my world religions books which are fascinating (have you ever read Hudson Smith?).
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Old April 27th, 2001, 10:27 AM   #44
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I never read Hudson Smith, but I have read everything Joseph Campbell ever wrote, which lead me to Marsha Sinetar, Mercia Eliade, Bauber, and others.

I grew up such an incredibly strict Catholic, and while I still find old, dark churches as comforting as comfort food, I am in no way religious or spiritual. Still, my mind is entralled by something strange as the view of time throughout spirituality/religions: the monochronic vs polychronic views of time. Its speaks to an eternal spirit unconfined by dogma and our need to create a God in our own limited vision.

Sorry, I know I am drifting.

And I have every math book, every chemistry and stats book in addition to French and Literature. Hell, I even kept my Industrial Literature novels, in French, maybe just to abuse myself with.

My greatest loss: not being able to find my first book: <i>Mike Mullighan and Mary Anne Steamshovel.</i> How I loved that book when I was 4!

I think I should add that, if I have no headache, I read very fast. I usually get through a novel in one sitting. A French novel used to take a dictionary (especially for the older french novels and the strange, strange written verb tenses of the 19th century!) would take 3 days. Anything else falls in the middle ot those time spans. I learned to read fast to understand what I was reading, otherwise, if I read "slowly, for content" I transpose letters and words as I read and nothing makes any sense to me.
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Old April 27th, 2001, 11:16 AM   #45
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Mike Mulligan was one of my favorites too roo. I do not have the original copy that I had when I was a child but I bought a copy for my son when he was born in 1988. It is a delightfully timeless children's book. Curious George too. Also anything by Marguerite Henry.
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