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Old April 27th, 2001, 11:42 AM   #46
roo
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Isn't it a great book? Someone at work told me, when we had a baby shower (everuone brought their favorite books as kids to give as gifts,) that there was a sequel, but I forgot and never hunted for it. It is not an intense longing, I just cruise the kids department of a bookstore looking for the book. I think my second book was a Curious Geogre. The I started on the Little House and the Naria Cronicles. I sort of made a huge leap there, but my parents had all of us reading the funnies, then the front page, of the newspaper by 4. For all my mother's well documented flaws, she did instill in all three of us a tremendous love of books aand reading.

One funny story, I know I told it before. When I was 7 I got my very own set of encyclopedias, which I had whined and begged for. It was the whole World Book set, including two massive tomes on medicine. I would turn to the child developement section, which had these cool pull out charts for social, intellectual, and emotional development. Every year on my birthday I held a review. Did I meet the "goals" of my age group? Was I on track? Then I would look ahead to see what my tasks were for the upcoming year. I felt like I was "cheating." Its a wonder I wasn't drowned by my family for this and other such strange behavior.

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Old April 27th, 2001, 12:04 PM   #47
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Terri loves Flannery O'Conner!! O joy!! (((Terri))) She is a long, long time favorite for me, and this semester, I let my Writing 1 students read <i>Wise Blood</i>.

I am clearly much older than you two youngsters I grew up on fairytales before they were scoured for violence and eroticism. I know that by kindergarten, a teacher was introducing me to children's stories; when my mother acquired a young rooster, she let me name him. I named him Timothy for a story of a timid bull named Timothy.

This week, my book club made the selection for summer--a hypertext novel called <i>Califia</i> by M.D. Coverley. It is on CD-ROM, available at Amazon.

(((((roo)))))
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Old April 27th, 2001, 12:14 PM   #48
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OMG it isnt about Pat Califia is it???? That is one scary woman! (((((((Lou))))))))
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Old April 27th, 2001, 12:30 PM   #49
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LOL (((((((((((((roo))))))))))))) No. <i>Califia</i> is the name of a mythical island and the source of the name for California. Ms. Coverley is my good friend Margie.
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Old April 27th, 2001, 02:31 PM   #50
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Lou I don't know that author. Tell me more. I fell in love with Flannery O'Conner when I read "A Good Man Is Hard To Find." I also fell in love with Toni Bambara (The Lesson). Heck, I just love to read! You are so lucky that you get to introduce these fabulous writers to your classes Lou, what a satisfying career you have.
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Old April 27th, 2001, 03:37 PM   #51
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I know I read her "A Good Man is Hard to Find." I found so many of her works to be strange, filled with emotional twists abd violence (unless I mis-remember?). I loved Kate Chopin, a woman a head of her time, and still love Eudora Welty. Welty is the southern female voice for me.

The other woman I love is Grace Paley. I actually house sat for her back in another life Talk about a woman who can pack one life into 2 pages!

((((Terri))))) sorry, forgot to hug ya
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Old April 27th, 2001, 11:13 PM   #52
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Wow! I have needed this thread!

Mags, this goes way back, but I wanted to say that my son was in the movie version of _Amy and Isabelle_, which was filmed in part where I live.

Liam, I'm hoping to become full-time at my college (I'm currently adjunct in the running for a full-time English position). I would love to start a book club. Can you send some pointers? sgott@gamewood.net

Lou, I love Flannery O'Connor, too.

I also love mysteries of any variety!
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Old April 27th, 2001, 11:28 PM   #53
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Terri, this is Marjorie's website, and if you click on the preview of <i>Califia</i>, you can get an idea of hypertext...

http://califia.hispeed.com/

Hi shergo--welcome to the world(s) of book lovers.

(((((roo)))))! That wonderful old dame Welty is STILL alive.
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Old April 27th, 2001, 11:37 PM   #54
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/me waves at ((((lou)))

is she really? If she keeps this up, after the nuclear bombs go off, we'll say only Eudora Wlety, Cher and cockroaches will survive! I am surfing journaling sites, lol
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Old April 28th, 2001, 01:27 AM   #55
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Yep, Welty is alive--92 this spring.

And I love Welty's stories, who wouldn't, but O'Conner gets in my marrow. Alice Walker has said of O'Conner that her stories are the south Walker knows, where there's not a magnolia blossom blooming. LOL

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Old April 28th, 2001, 07:57 AM   #56
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Interesting webpage there Lou.

O'Conner gets in your marrow. I'm thinking about that. I guess what I like best about O'Conner is that you really have to think about what is going on in her stories. She weaves subtle ugliness and overlays it with the innocence of ignorance. She makes us open our eyes to society and examine our own motives and history. She gives an identity to poverty and cruelty. I will never say "let the cat out of the bag" again without thinking of O'Conner.
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Old April 28th, 2001, 12:34 PM   #57
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I was going to go to Vail to day but woke up congested and sick. So I post here instead.

There is nothing subtle about the ugliness of the south. I say that as someone who lived half their childhood south of the Mason-Dixion line, and almost half my adulthood there as well. But there is a beauty to the southern culture one can not appericitate unless you have lived there and immeresed in it.

As a "minority," I prefer the south to the north. Is that shocking? In the south, they "hate the race but love the man." In the north it is the opposite, the "hatethe man and love the race." What that means is you can know someone for 12 years and not know they are a racist pig-dog in the north. (On the other hand, in Southern colleges I was not penalized for being Asian as I was in the north. GPA and GRE had the highest points as an asian, the expectations for whites and every other race group are lower than min. qualifications for asians. Talk about backlash for a culture that values scholastics and hard work!)

In fact I have. I have actually had people ask me, (referring to African-Americans) if I thought "that they think like us?" (Aside from the racist comment itself...Who the heck she thought US was is still something I wonder about!!!! Asians are not white people with funny eyes!) In the south you do not waste time, do not waste years in freindships with secret bigots. No sireee Bob! You know right up front that they are or are not a bigot. Heck, in South Carolina, in the state form for application to colleges, the racial breakdown as late as 1994 was "White" "Black" "Other" which enraged me like nothing else, yet also, I found refreshing at least in its obnoxious honesty.

But the one thing the south has that the north never will is a duty to form. Say what you will about rules, but there is an expectation that when the chips are down and life is biting your butt, you fuction and act as if. That alone will get you through some of life's more difficult spots. It will get you through it till you can process what has happened. That might seem hard to people not raised with such expectations, but it is actually, IMHO, a form of grace!

I am not saying that excuses all the other flaws, and they are legion, of the south. But you cannot compare apples and oranges, industrial mentalities vs argarian ones.


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Old April 28th, 2001, 12:56 PM   #58
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You know that the term "Agrarians" is applied to a tradition of literature in the south? As far as O'Conner was concerned, however, she was a product of New Criticism and didn't study or know much about the formal Agrarian ideologies. But just by virtue of her southern upbringing (Georgia), she manifests Agrarian ideas. For example, she was steeped in a religious (Catholic) conservatism that let her write that southerners "still believe that man has fallen and that he is only perfectible by God's grace, not by his own unaided efforts." LOL Nice little basis for racism there, and probably the grounding for her famous remark, "I can't see James Baldwin in Georgia." So there's one of roo's easy-to-deal-with up-front racists. It is her religious positions that fascinate me as they play out in characters like Hazel Motes.
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Old April 28th, 2001, 01:04 PM   #59
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The hidden minority in the south are Catholics. They are treated and watched with suspicion as if they will rise up and jump on a broom. Its interesting that O'Conner was Catholic.

Don't you just love Fall/Redemptionist theology? I always perferred Mathew Fox's co-creationismm (before the pope defrocked him for daring to call the <i>orginal sin</i> the <i>orginal blessing</i>).
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Old April 28th, 2001, 01:11 PM   #60
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((((roo)))) Yes! And for O'Conner, redemption gets into your current fav topic--myth and metaphor. Hazel Motes, for example, has to blind himself in order to attempt redemption. Ooooooooooooo. At the end of "A Good Man Is Hard To Find," the Misfit says that the grandmother would have been a good woman if there'd been someone around every day to shoot her. Exactly. For O'Conner, redemption has the potential to occur only when a person faces death, violent death.
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