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Old April 28th, 2001, 02:12 PM   #61
roo
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The reason I never went into New Age anything is the Pittsburgh influence in my life. All the richest people associated with Pittsburgh (Scaifes, Mellons, Rockerfellers, Kings, Clays, Fricks, Heinzs, Carneigies et al) were Calvinists. I am sure I have this wrong as I have the Catholic view of Calvinism in my head: "Your wealth/position equates to a discernable level of spiritual development."

When I first read some of the popular new age books, I was stung by the insistance that people chose to be born in the life they are in, with the issues at hand, as if to work out old karmic debts. First it offended me in the case of people who suffered abuse as children... as a nice way to blame the victim, and secondly, I found it a form of Calvinism and the poor are poor and its their own damn fault. Why not just say, "Let them eat cake" and be done with it?

Oh one funny new age comment/aside. I went to risk management yesterday about my health isurance being switched in June. I was a tad bitter. I said, "If some naked freak from new age Naropia Institute wanted to treat me by dancing naked around me, coated in scared oils and burning a healing twig of herb... hey, I'd be covered with this insurance plan, but I am not covered to see a competent neurologist? What's up with that?"
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Old April 28th, 2001, 02:16 PM   #62
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You are covered for a curandera????

LOL!

No. Wait. I shouldn't laugh. That's awful.
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Old April 28th, 2001, 02:19 PM   #63
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Can you believe this crap. An HMO in Boulder... as I refer to it, a city of 20 square miles surrounded by reality ... is a strange strange thing. And yes, I am covered for "spiritual counselling" and "alternative treatment" and one neurologist in the city, who has been chastised by the state edical board once already.
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Old May 11th, 2001, 05:29 PM   #64
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oh my

i'm obsessed with truman capote!
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Old May 24th, 2001, 02:09 PM   #65
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So what are all the readers reading?

I am on summer vacation now, and I tired of reading magazines this week, so I picked up a copy of Anne Tyler's "Patchwork Planet." I like Tyler, have read several of her many Baltimore novels, and knew I'd be in for an undemanding but absorbing read. Well. On the first page, I realized I'd read this book. Rats. <g>
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Old May 24th, 2001, 02:27 PM   #66
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I finally got to the central library (I'd cleaned out the local branch...), so I've been reading new things, though I have to admit that lots of it is by familiar/favored authors. The best so far: <u>Juniper, Gentian and Rosemary</u> by Pamela Dean. She does a good job with making obscure fairy tales apply to real life ('ve raved about <u>Tam Lin</u> before), and the "supernatural" elements really sneak up on you! Her <u>The Dubious Hills</u> was more original and very thought-provoking.

Currently finishing off the last of Marion Zimmer Bradley's "Light" series (<u>Ghostlight</u>, <u>Witchlight</u>, <u>Gravelight</u>, <u>Heartlight</u>). I'd read two of these before but didn't see nearly as well how they tied together, though the individual stories were up to her usual standard. The middle two books were critical to seeing it as a series. :::sigh:: I'm going to miss MZB...

My desire exceeded my capacity, so I have to go renew half of the stack tomorrow! I also have to find where they hide the new science fiction, because there are a couple of series I've fallen behind in.
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Old June 6th, 2001, 09:45 AM   #67
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Also notice that the little boy in O'Conner's A Good Man is Hard to Find is named John Wesley. I think that O'Conner does a fine job exposing hypocrisy in society in her allusions. While the grandmother invokes the name of Jesus (who represents all that is holy and pure) she herself selfishly pleads for her own life to be spared but never offers herself in the place of her own son or his children. I am always left to wonder after reading an O'Conner story. Is she using religious allusions to point out the hideous discrepancies in her characters and plot? Or is there a subtle mockery of religion going on that trivializes the faith of true believers? I know this, her stories compell me to look inward and examine the cliches that come up in the normal course of life.

Next topic. Have any of you heard of a young author named Michael Chabon? I picked up one of his books of short stories titled "Werewolves In Their Youth." WOW I am being blown away. I checked this book out of the library because I knew this young mans father when I was a young woman myself. His father was a doctor in Baltimore,involved in the administration at the hospital where I worked. He is an excellent writer!! His short stories have appeared in magazines. He has a wonderful way with words.
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Old June 6th, 2001, 10:53 AM   #68
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Morning (((Terri))) Yes, I know Michael Chabon's work. His novel "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay" won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize. His first novel "The Mysteries of Pittsburg" was a literary hit. He attended the university that I also attended, and he also did some parttime teaching at the college where I teach now. His first wife was a young woman who I admired very much, and I heard him read last month at a book festival in L.A.

It's too early for me to talk about O'Conner. <GG>
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Old June 6th, 2001, 01:07 PM   #69
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LOL Lou, too early for O'Conner. I have been reading some more of Chabon this morning, I'm in love.
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Old June 12th, 2001, 10:04 AM   #70
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Ok this is my summer of discovery. I took out a book at the library when I was there by Ha Jin. I love anything Chinese especially literature, maybe I have mentioned that. Anyway it is a book of short stories called {The Bridegroom} stories. I LOVE IT! Now I have to go devour everything this man has ever written.
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Old June 12th, 2001, 12:08 PM   #71
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((((Terri)))) My book club read Ha Jin's novel <i>Waiting</i> a while back. What a kick that you are finding authors you like.
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Old June 18th, 2001, 07:01 PM   #72
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A must read "A Tinker's Damn" by Darryl Wimberley. A story of families, land, violence, society, politics, business and sex, (not neccessarily in that order) set in early 20th century rural northern Florida.
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Old June 18th, 2001, 07:03 PM   #73
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Oh by the way ((Lou)) I read Ha Jin's short novel "In The Pond" and found it to be a masterpiece.
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Old June 23rd, 2001, 01:39 PM   #74
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Exclamation Can I interest anyone in participating in a book?

I am in search of women who are willing to participate in a questionnaire for a book. Your answers will be used to create completely anonymous, one-page, journal pieces.
The end result will be a book containing a glorious blend of women?s current opinions, hopes, dreams, and struggles, combined with my moving oil portraits of women of all
makes and in all stages of life. There are no questions that will identify you physically in any way, and there will be no references to connect you with what you?ve written. Women of all ages, races, religions, and lifestyles are urged to participate. I want the pages to be a reflection of all societal niches, showing the similarities and joined strength of women, while being unbiased and open-minded to show the much-needed differences we have among us. We carry the source of life within us, and all women have something good to offer humanity. Please e-mail me for more information or to participate in my little piece of women?s activism. shadoebox@hotmail.com.
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Old November 4th, 2001, 11:08 AM   #75
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Hey ((((readers))))!

We've let this folder slip when I bet we've all been reading. In October, my book club read <i>Cane River,</i> though at this moment I can't recall the name of the author. The book covers the lives of four generations of black women in Louisiana, from the period of slavery through the reconstruction and into the 20th century. The women are ancestors of the author, who researched her family. For me, Toni Morrison and Gloria Naylor are the best when it comes to the stories of black women, but this novel has a good story to tell, one that kept me turning the pages.

Now, for November, the club is reading Tracy Chevalier's <i>Girl With A Pearl Earring.</i> I am almost finished, and last night, I closed the book before reading the final short section that will take me to ten years after the central events of the novel. I stopped reading because I want to make this book last longer. It is the story of a girl named Griet, the daughter of a tile painter in Delft in the mid-17th century, who becomes the maid for the Vermeer household--Vermeer, the famed painter. This novel has atmosphere, an internal anxiety and expectation that is the color of ochre. I have enjoyed it very much.

So what are the rest of you reading?
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