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Old March 17th, 2004, 06:49 PM   #1
Savannah
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Food Allergies

have you got them, which ones, how do they affect you, how do you manage to avoid the foods?

i did a food challenge a while ago and my suspicions were confirmed that i was allergic to wheat, yeast and dairy

now wheat is in sooooooo many foods that it can be very difficult to avoid.
dairy doesn't seem to be a problem, yeast, well i suffer occasionally
as i do enjoy the odd glass of wine.

when i have wheat i get IBS, headaches, bloating, lymphodema...what a pain !
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Old March 18th, 2004, 04:21 PM   #2
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I am very allergic to latex and it is in a lot of food. With my other digestive woes, I have a very limited group of foods to choose from. Most of the time I simply don't want to eat, so I will drink Ensure or something similar just to keep my body going and stop the weight loss.
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Old March 18th, 2004, 07:35 PM   #3
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I don't think latex is <i>in</i> a lot of food, but rather, a person with a latex allergy experiences cross-reactivity in a lot of foods, particularly fresh fruits. I have a latex allergy, and have developed allergies in the last couple years to foods that I've always been able to eat, including kiwi, honeydew melon, and -- most recently -- strawberries.

Or is there something I don't know about latex being in food? What foods are you thinking of, brede?
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Old March 18th, 2004, 10:16 PM   #4
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Probably worn in the handling, processing and packaging of fruit... It's a possibility, though you'd think trace amounts would be washed off...

Oh, what the hell do I know? Speaking speculatively. :P
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Old March 18th, 2004, 10:41 PM   #5
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THE LATEX-FOOD ALLERGY CONNECTION

http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m08...89/print.jhtml

It has been recognized that in some persons there is a link between latex allergy and food allergy. Erick (26, p 793) has referred to this as the "latex diet syndrome." Patients with latex allergy need to be evaluated and, if appropriate, counseled related to diagnosed food allergies. It has been recommended that patients allergic to natural rubber latex be tested to assess potential sensitivity to foods commonly associated with natural rubber latex allergy and also to foods associated with tree or grass pollen allergy [29]. The rationale for this recommendation is that pollen-associated atopy, which is also related to food allergy, is believed to coexist with natural rubber latex allergy in some cases [29]. Patients with certain food allergies may also need assessment and counseling related to potential or diagnosed latex allergy.

Some have estimated that as many as 50% to 70% of persons with latex allergy also have IgE antibodies to some foods, such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, and/or grain [30]. The latex allergy- food allergy connection is believed to be the result of cross-reacting proteins between foods and natural rubber latex. Considerable research is being undertaken to define the proteins involved in these corss reactions.

Current research would implicate the involvement of chitinases. Chitinases are enzymes involved in plant defense systems [31]. They are hydrolytic enzymes that work to break down chitin, which is a structural component of insect exoskeletons and cell walls of fungi [32,33]. There appear to be benefits of these enzymes to plants that may result in increased crop yield. These enzymes have protein domains similar to those in natural rubber latex and these appear to be causative in terms of cross-reactions with foods [30,31,32,34-43]. One author has indicated that allergenic potential needs to be considered when engineering food crops to have increased chitinase levels [43].

One study of 137 patients with rubber latex allergy [44] found that 21.1% also had allergies to foods. Foods to which patients in that study were allergic included banana (18.3%); avocado (16.3%); shellfish (12.2%); kiwi fruit (12.2%); fish (8.1%); tomato (6.1%), and watermelon, peach, and carrot (less than 5% each) [44]. Other individual food sensitivities were also noted in this study [44]. Beezhold, Sussman, Liss, and Chang [45] reported positive skin tests in persons with latex-sensitivity to the following foods; avocado, potato, banana, chestnut, kiwi fruit, and tomato. Conversely, GarciaOrtiz et al [20] studied fruit-allergic patients and found latex sensitization in 49 of 57 (86%) compared to latex sensitization in only 2 of 50 controls (4%). Fruits most commonly associated with clinical symptoms of allergy in this study were muskmelon, watermelon, peach, banana, cherry, and pear. Some subjects with latex sensitivity in this study also had evidence of allergy to other foods such as almond, hazelnut, s unflower seeds, and walnuts [20].

Chestnut, banana, and avocado have been some of the most studied foods with regard to potential cross-reactivity with latex [1,7,21,34-45]. Diaz-Perales et al [37] have isolated Class I chitinases with a hevein-like domain from chestnuts and avocado and believe these to be the allergens involved in producing symptoms in latex-sensitive patients consuming these foodstuffs. Research by Posch et al [41] has associated Class I chitinases and their hevein domain with avocado and natural rubber latex-linked allergies. Blanco et al [34] studied 18 subjects with latex-sensitivity who were either allergic to chestnut or avocado or both. Chestnut class I chitinase evoked a positive skin prick test in 13 of the 18 subjects and avocado class I chitinase evoked a positive skin prick test in 12 subjects. Chen et al [35] implicated hevein as the cross-reacting allergen in latex that interacts with avocado, Chen et al [35] also found seropositive IgE avocado antibodies in a high percentage of persons in 2 study groups--118 health care workers and 78 spina bifida patients both with latex allergies. These IgE avocado antibodies were significantly associated (P[less than].001) with hevein-specific IgE antibodies in these populations. Sowka et al [43] identified a 32-Kda avocado allergen called Prs a 1, which was recognized by 15 to 20 avocado and/or natural rubber latex sensitive patients. The Prs a 1 avocado allergen demonstrated cross-reactivity with latex proteins, especially a 20-Kda allergen believed to be prohevein. In this study, the avocado and latex allergens were cited as being 70% alike in terms of the domains that were chitin-binding [43].

Mikkola et al [39] found that 9 out of 15 serum samples from patients allergic to latex with IgE to hevein also showed IgE binding to 32 and 33 Kd banana proteins. These researchers reported that the hevein-like domain of endochitinase in banana was responsible for cross-reaction. Sanchez-Monge et al [42] also identified Class I chitinases with hevein as being the agents in banana responsible for cross-reactivity with latex. In an earlier case study involving a nurse with latex-sensitivity working in a surgical intensive care unit, it was demonstrated by radioallergosorbent testing that banana extract could inhibit binding of latex-specific IgE to solid phase latex in a dose-dependent fashion (r=0.97) in persons with latex sensitivity [40].

In addition to chestnut, avocado, and banana, other foods have been implicated as being potentially cross-reactive with natural rubber latex and therefore capable of causing a Type Imediated food allergy. Potato and tomato have also been noted as potentially cross-reactive. It is postulated that patatin, a storage protein with structural similarity to rubber latex proteins, may be involved in these cross-reactions [45,46]. Kiwi fruit containing a 43 Kda allergen may also cross-react with latex [38]. Cross-reactivity between latex and sweet pepper has also been reported. These researchers noted a potential link with prohevein [47]. Before that report, a case study of a 23-year old nurse sensitive to pepper was published [48]. Cross-reactivity has also been noted between buckwheat and rubber latex. This cross-reactivity may be of importance, according to the authors, because of the use of buckwheat flour in many health food products [49]. Papain is extracted from the latex of the papaya tree and is not only us ed in food processing procedures, such as clarifying beer or tenderizing meat, but is also used in drug and beauty products [50]. One study demonstrated that papain extract caused positive skin prick tests reactions in 18 of 30 persons with latex sensitivity [50].

Foods commonly cited as being potentially cross-reactive with natural rubber latex are shown in the Table. Other foods or food products implicated as being cross-reactive with latex include dill, peaches, plums, cherries, hazelnut, sage, melon, celery, mango, carrot, apple, pear, papaya, oregano, almonds, ginger, and bromelin from pineapple [1,26,51,52]. The ACAAI asserts that cross-reaction with citrus, coconut, condurango bark, mango, passion fruit, peanut, peppers, and fig are rare [1]. Condurango bark is sold as an herb and is purported to have diuretic effects and medicinal properties [53]. Kumar [16] also notes that cross-reaction with apricot is rare. Numerous other vegetables, pollens, and plants have been listed as being potential or suspected as being rubber latex cross-reactive [26,30]. Further, a recent report cited the potential of jelutong sap (a natural chewing gum base) to be cross-reactive with natural rubber latex [54]. Common food allergens such as soybean and peanut have been listed as be ing associated with natural rubber latex allergy in the category of "low or undetermined" association (26, p 793).

In some instances, the coexistence of natural rubber latex allergy and food allergy may simply represent separate allergies in an atopic person and may not be the result of cross-reaction. The presence of food proteins in nonfood products and potential cross-reaction with natural rubber latex should also be noted. One case study has been reported involving a 42-year old woman where angioedema seemed to be provoked by natural rubber latex, banana, and banana hair conditioner [55].
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Old March 19th, 2004, 03:09 PM   #6
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Wow, Addie, thanks for that post. I really wasn't sure what the deal was with latex/food allergy. Every food mentioned causes a terrible reaction in me. Carrots are also a real problem. I love fruits and vegetables, but most of them don't love me back! Even the ones marked rare are a problem with me. Any lotion with soy in it will cause a skin reaction.

All I know is that the older I get the more restrictive my diet has become. And with colitis, I am constantly on a liquid diet so it doesn't matter much anyway. When I garden, I have to be very careful with certain plants. Anything that "bleeds" white (like a rubber tree plant) will burn away my skin as I watch. Part of the reason that I have an allergic reaction may be that my immuno-system is out of whack. Colitis is suspected of being an autoimmune disease. Now that I have to take immunosuppressants, I have to be very careful about getting an infection of any kind. I don't know how that would change my food allergies, or even if it will. Since food = pain for me, I'm not in any hurry to find out.

Again, thanks Addie, I have saved the site and will do some more research.
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Old March 25th, 2005, 10:14 AM   #7
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Very recently I have been having problems with apples. It seems like my mouth has a reaction to the skin of the apple. My mouth gets very itchy and soar.
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Old March 25th, 2005, 12:25 PM   #8
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It is strange how allergies come to be. Grew up eating shell fish, clams. lobsters,crabs, etc. Appox 10years ago the allergies kicked in. Damn those allergies.
((((((((Addie))))))))) thanks for all that info. You are a true treasure.
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Old June 22nd, 2008, 10:56 PM   #9
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That?s what happened to me!!! I am a big shell fish girl LOVE IT grew up next to the ocean so ever since I was little it was shell fish galore at my house?then OUT OF NOWHERE I became super allergic to it! I mean crazy allergic! I cant even smell it!!! It was hard it first cuz it was a big part of what I ate?.im even scared to eat out. Once I went to a Chinese restaurant ordered an egg roll they gave me a shrimp roll took a lil bite of it ( not knowing it had shell fish in it) I blew up like a blow fish had to be rushed to the hospital to get a shot!!! So now I ask like 100 times ?is there any shell fish in this? hhahaha I hate to b annoying but hey! Its life or death
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Old June 23rd, 2008, 11:21 PM   #10
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My cousin had allergies to wheat and peanut butter. As a kid, I remember thinking, "How can anyone grow up not being able to eat PBJ???" Then about a month ago, I discovered I had a few food allergies (beets, among them). Loads of fun.
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Old June 24th, 2008, 09:14 PM   #11
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Food allergies, no. But I can't drink red wine because it gives me migraines.

I don't eat certain fish either but that by choice.

About the only thing I don't like, that I can think of, is hominy and creamed corn, blech...
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Old June 26th, 2008, 12:34 AM   #12
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Like Napolitana* I grew up near the ocean.* Shell fish was something* that we* were acustomed to.** Then out of the blue my allergy started..* Now my oldest daughter has developed the allergy to** shell fish as well.* she developed it at a younger age.** She has always loved shell fish as well. Point of* important info for those allergic to shell fish!!!* Please when going for* medical tests remind them of your allergy.** In a lot of cases they will have to change what they would normally have you* take.** ...* Most of* shell fish allergy is connected with iodine.* Iodine is used in a lot of tests ..* ex.. colonoscopy* you won't be able to use GoLitely/ but* something else..* Otherwise* you could* go into anthrophalic(sp) shock.. the same with some of the dyes they use.. so PLEASE be sure to remind them of this allergy.
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